kenobi-wan-obi:

blackphoenix77:

timetravelandrocketpoweredapes:

Super cosplayer Jay Justice

Cosplayer deviantart / facebook / tumblr

One of the best cosplayers in the game

!!!!

fandomsandfeminism:

[Description: Images of Michael Brown, Renisha McBride, Eric Garner, and Trayvon Martin, all unarmed black Americans shot and killed. Langston Hughes’ poem "Harlem"Image of the man with the American flag shirt throwing a tear gas canister in Ferguson] 

Or does it explode? 

americana-exxxotica said: I've always been confused about this. Why are things like Kool-aid and friend chicken always associated with Black men and women? It seems baseless.

whitepeoplestealingculture:

It all came from the KKK film: Birth of a Nation.

D.W. Griffith’s seminal and supremely racist 1915 silent movie about the supposedly heroic founding of the Ku Klux Klan was a huge sensation when it debuted. One scene in the three-hor features a group of actors portraying shiftless black elected officials acting rowdy and crudely in a legislative hall. (The message to the audience: These are the dangers of letting blacks vote.) Some of the legislators are shown drinking. Others had their feet kicked up on their desks. And one of them was very ostentatiously eating fried chicken.

"That image really solidified the way white people thought of black people and fried chicken," Schmidt said.

Schmidt said that like watermelon, that other food that’s been a mainstay in racist depictions of blacks, chicken was also a good vehicle for racism because of the way people eat it. (According to government stats, blacks are underrepresented among watermelon consumers.) “It’s a food you eat with your hands, and therefore it’s dirty,” Schmidt said. “Table manners are a way of determining who is worthy of respect or not.”

(X)

damgoodjob:

manif3stlove:

dynastylnoire:

strangeasanjles:

godinthebrokenness:

Plenty of films have taken a stab at bringing Bible stories to life, from “The Ten Commandments” and “Jesus Christ: Superstar” to this year’s “Son of God” and “Noah.” But despite those movies’ different genres and tones, these films all tend to share one similarity: They have white casts, even though the Bible’s characters would have been from parts of Africa or the Middle East. Photographer James C. Lewis of Noire3000 | N3K Photo Studios has decided to rectify by presenting these iconic figures in a new light.

Lewis’ “Icons Of The Bible” photo series depicts some of the most famous characters from the Old and New Testament exclusively as people of color, including Simon Peter, Elijah, King Solomon and the archangel Gabriel. The series, which will be fully released in October, features 70 models who identify as either Asian, Native American, Hispanic, African, Middle Eastern, Black American and West Indian.

"I think it is very important to see one’s self in the Scripture so that it may become real in their eyes," Lewis told The Huffington Post. "The whitewashing of the Bible has always bothered me. However I’m happy to now have the opportunity to give a different point of view."

(Article)

Gabriel tho!

Gabriel can take me up immediately

Solomon

Look at this BEAUTIFUL ish

a-spoon-is-born:

anyone know offhand what this is from?